Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

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Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

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https://www.rollingstone.com/music/musi ... f-1223933/


Bruce Kulick on His Years With Kiss, Meat Loaf, and Grand Funk Railroad

He played lead guitar in Kiss from 1984 to 1996, and he’s fronted Grand Funk in the place of Mark Farner for the past 20 years
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Hotter Than Heck »

Great Bruce interview! Read it, guys!!

Thanks for posting it!
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Goodwilltowardsall »

I really enjoyed a solo album of his, sorry can't remember the name.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

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I have a good ad blocker and i still couldn't read it for all the pop ups.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

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“I’m always going to wave the flag for the non-makeup era,” Kulick tells Rolling Stone on the phone from his home in Henderson, Nevada. “I know it’s a little harder for Gene [Simmons] and Paul [Stanley] and the Kiss machine to recognize it. The Hall of Fame wouldn’t even recognize it, which was a real travesty. But honestly, the fans know. And the fans are real grateful for all those albums and what happened during those years.”

We spoke to Kulick not just about his years in Kiss, but also his long career before and after his time in the group.

How has your life been during the pandemic?

I was obviously in shock at first. In some ways, I thought this was a nice break. But it suddenly dawned on me that I felt much more productive by engaging my fans and entertaining them, and knowing that everything during the lockdown months was going to be on social media, I jumped in, really, in a big way. I started to speak directly to the fans.

When I say my fans, I mean my Kiss fan base. There are many people that know me as a journeyman guitar player that’s played with a lot of different artists. But of course those 12 years in Kiss is my biggest credit. And very fortunately, because of the power of Kiss, I think you’re incredibly aware how rabid the fans are for them. They love my era, too. There’s plenty to discuss and share and entertain them with.

First, I came up with the idea of doing these isolated riffs where I’d play just the solo of “Hide Your Heart” or “Heart of Chrome” from Revenge. I kept doing that and people were going crazy. The number of people, and the response, was wild.

Also, my brother [Bob Kulick] passed away during the pandemic. It wasn’t related to Covid, but it was pretty shocking. I did a 20-minute documentary-style story from my viewpoint of my brother, and what his career was, and what it meant to me.

Were you a big Kiss fan back in the Seventies?

To me, Kiss in the beginning was a bit gimmicky to me. I got turned around in a big way when I heard Destroyer, and then when I actually saw them live. I was like, “I get it. This is amazing. Oh, my God. What a show. What powerful songs.” I got it.

Before that, I didn’t even like it when Bowie put that lightning bolt on the cover of Aladdin Sane. I was like, “What the hell is this?” To me, I didn’t get that. It was a little odd of me to be so judgmental. Of course, years later, I obviously got it.

How did you first hear about the possibility of playing with them?

I have never really discussed it publicly, but I auditioned for them when they had the cattle call to replace Ace [in 1981]. My brother always told them, “Bruce is great. You gotta hear Bruce.” But I was not ready to walk into that band, especially where they were at, wearing makeup and what they were doing.

All I remember from the audition is I couldn’t hear myself, but Gene said, “Nice vibrato.” That was it.

Years later, Mitch Weissman, who looked like a Jewish Paul McCartney and was in [the 1977 Broadway musical] Beatlemania, told Paul [Stanley], “If you need a ghost guitar guy, call Bruce. He can really play.” I don’t even know how he knew about my playing.

But all of a sudden, where my brother used to always get the ghost-guitarwork calls, I get the call. And so I helped them out on one song on [1984’s] Animalize and a little bit at the end of another. [Editor’s note: Kulick appears on “Lonely Is the Hunter” and “Murder in High-Heels.”]

Paul knew me since I’d sometimes hang out with him socially when my brother would take me into the city. Now I get a chance to plug in and play my guitar for Paul. He was happy with what I did, and before I left, he says to me, “Don’t cut your hair.” I’m like, “What the hell is that about?” It was about shoulder length.

Within a month from that, I get a call from the Kiss office. They’re asking me to fill in for Mark St. John, the new guitar player. He has an arthritic condition where his hand got swollen. I was like, “I just won the lottery. I might be in Kiss for two to six weeks.”

They’d been through a lot of guitar players in a very short time by then. I’m sure it didn’t feel stable at first.

I was suddenly aware of the opportunity, and I was very excited to prove myself. I tried so hard I actually injured my arm where I missed two weeks of rehearsals. Gene called me and said, “Are you just scared, or did you really injure yourself?” I said, “No, no, no. Paul knows the doctor I saw. I pulled a nerve in my arm. I’m going to be OK. The doctor said it’s going to heal. I’m doing everything he said, and I’ll have a full week of rehearsal with you guys and I’ll know the songs. I promise.”

To get a call like that from Gene Simmons, I’m realizing I may have screwed the biggest opportunity I’ll ever have to be the Kiss guitarist, even though at the time it was only filling in.

How much are you trying to replicate the Ace and Vinnie Vincent guitar parts, and how much are you trying to put your own spin on them?

That’s a great question. Paul gave me a live tape that showed Vinnie Vincent, and I didn’t think he had the right approach to a lot of the songs. Unlike modern Kiss … and Tommy Thayer is a dear friend. He was totally ready to step in for Ace when Ace was being very difficult and eventually disappeared, and there is Tommy with the gig. They wanted Tommy to be the Spaceman and play Ace’s riffs.

I was never given that edict by Gene and Paul. But they also knew I had a good enough musical approach to their songs. I love to learn the signature riffs of anyone’s solo, and then make it my own. I don’t have to be a clone, but I can certainly show you the respect and give you those riffs that you’re used to hearing, but maybe play it a little bit with my swagger and my interpretation so it’s not lost to the world at all. It’s still the song.

I always felt I had a good knack for that. I do it currently with Grand Funk now, and have for 20 years. I’m not playing Mark Farner’s solos note-for-note, but I’m surely showing all the respect in the world to the licks and the riffs and the vibe. I had to do that for Todd Rundgren with Meat Loaf and etc., etc. … What can I say? I was the right guy at the right time with Kiss.

I’m sure in the early weeks of touring, it was kind of nerve-racking. Fans must have been like, “Who is this guy? Where’s Mark? Where’s Vinnie?”

News didn’t travel the way it does now. No one knew who they were seeing. A lot of them thought it was Mark since there was hype about a new guitar player on the back cover of Animalize. Kerrang! was very quick to get the news out that I’d be filling in. But it was weird.

There I was. I thought I had the right look, the right personality, and I certainly played what they wanted. By the time the six weeks were over and I was heading back, even though I knew Mark was getting better and they probably needed to give him a shot, contractually or otherwise, I knew I had the home team advantage.

That’s what happened. He actually toured with us, watched the show, did half of a show, did the second half of the show, did a whole show, and they sent him home. It was obvious the gig should be mine. I played it fair. Mark and I used to jam backstage. I showed him a lot of respect. He was a different kind of guitar player. It was an unfortunate situation. But to this day, I swear I knew the second I saw his information, the announcement in the magazine, and I saw the photos in the magazine, I was like, “This is wrong. This is not the right guy for this band. This guy will never last.”

I didn’t know I would replace him, but to me, it was kind of prophetic. It was kind of like Eric Carr saying to some friends when he met Eric Singer at a Paul Stanley gig, “This is the guy that is going to replace me in Kiss.” That’s what he said.

How was your experience making Asylum now that you were finally a full-time member?

Top of the world. I’m recording at Electric Lady. And even though I’d already recorded at Electric Lady with Michael Bolton and even the Good Rats, there is no way it was more special to me than to be there with Kiss and do interviews and be the guitar player with Gene and Paul. They worked me hard. I remember being there every day for three weeks in a row where I didn’t get any weekends off or holidays. It was July 4th and I remember Gene going, “I’m working. You’re coming in. Let’s do some guitars.”

I was on the roof. I was in the Village. We did some hot dogs and what you do for July 4th. But then I was getting back to the studio and recording guitars.

You wrote “King of the Mountain” with Desmond Child and Paul Stanley.

I was thrilled to have the opportunity. I was like, “Hey, Paul, I’ve got these chords.” It was the same thing with Gene. I was still learning the politics of what it was to work for the two of them. They compete. If you show a song to Gene and he goes “nah” and you show Paul and he finds out you presented it to Gene, Paul is not going to do it. The two of them are oddly competitive. That’s part of their success. But there were always these landmines I had to navigate, if you get what I mean.

The perception of this time by the fans is that Gene was focused on outside projects and Paul was the one in the driver’s seat of Kiss. Is that accurate?

It’s totally accurate. That’s what they were going through. Gene was a little lost not being in makeup. He really needed to what he wanted to do, and Paul resented it. I was just trying to navigate what was happening. I stayed focused on doing the best job I could. They didn’t know me that long to get me in the middle of it. Within time, they did sometimes defer to me. It was like your parents having a fight and they’re asking the kid, “What do you think?”

It was awful. It didn’t happen a lot like that, but you can imagine. The two of them are very competitive that way. But without Paul’s drive and commitment to the band, the whole thing would have fallen apart. I know that. He’s right about that.

Gene admits that he lost his way, he lost that direction. But Gene had to do that. He didn’t do drugs. He just wanted to sleep with a million women and be a bigger star than he was with Kiss, if that was possible, by doing the movies, by doing TV, whatever he could get his hands on. He’s a very hard worker, and he’s very successful.

Having Eric Carr there must have helped. He was such a great drummer.

Let me tell you. What a sweet guy. What a talented guy. But I’d be riding with him in the limo when I first joined the band, and all he’d do was complain to me. I’d be like, “Stop. Please. I’m having the time of my life. I’m flying first class. We’re in limousines and we’re playing sold out gigs, and you want to complain to me? Stop.” Within a few years, I understood that all his gripes had their merits. You just had to know how to handle it, if you know what I mean.

Right. You have to understand your role in the band. There are two people in charge, and you work for them. It makes your life easier to accept that.

There’s a pecking order in every band. Bands are like families and there’s a hierarchy. This is life. It’s family. It’s politics. If you don’t understand all that, you’re going to be miserable or you’re going to be shown the door.

It was always shocking to me to see how many musicians fight constantly and don’t even stay in the same hotel or take the same transportation. They just see each other onstage. It’s really remarkable how a band and music and musicians can be.

As much as Gene and Paul want to criticize Ace and Peter for their faults, and it’s fair game, they’ve admitted to their faults with their ego and their behavior.

Let’s talk about Crazy Nights. Some fans felt the synths were too heavy on it.

We were clearly watching the successes of other bands, and Ron Nevison was a very powerful, popular producer. He worked with Ozzy and he worked with Heart and he gave them big, big hits. You can’t fault Gene and Paul for wanting to work with people that could do the same for them, get them those big, big hits.

And so Nevison comes in and chooses the songs. He has a little keyboard blended in and it was poppy, but then we had a big international hit with “Crazy Crazy Nights.” My guitar is front and forward on everything, so I wasn’t upset. Some fans love the album. Some fans thought it was a little too pop. That was just what was happening then.

It didn’t mean we didn’t think it was a great album. I thought the artwork was strong, and the touring went very well. We did a lot of festivals. It was a good era for the band.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by vinniestkulick »

Wow, extensive! Good for BK!
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by vinniestkulick »

Goodwilltowardsall wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:09 am I really enjoyed a solo album of his, sorry can't remember the name.
I think this is the order of his solo albums:
AUDIO DOG
TRANSFORMER
BK3
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

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Tell me about writing “No, No, No” with Gene and Eric.

Gene wanted one of those uptempo double-bass-drum kind of things, and Eric loved that Van Halen style too. I was able to help interpret the riff and some of the connections. Gene’s a lot of fun to write with. They’re both very different. Paul is super creative, but he’s more sensitive to everything and has to feel what he wants it to do. Gene will throw a million things against the wall and see what sticks.

It seems like the goal with Hot in the Shade was to get back to basics somewhat.

Yeah. Then it was self-produced, so Gene and Paul got more like, “Well, we tried the big producer and it did OK, but it didn’t do anything that huge, so let’s just do what we need to do.” For me, guitar-wise, I became more meat and potatoes and more Les Paul and less whammy bar, ESP, Floyd Rose Strat because I didn’t have to go that way as much.

Revisiting Hot in the Shade, there were a lot of good songs there. Too many songs, probably. There was 15, which was weird. It was CD. You could do that back then. But we had a hit with “Forever.” I thought “Hide Your Heart” was a good song. There’s some other good tracks on it.

These were long tours at this point and I’ve read that the shows weren’t always full. Do you remember that?

Each tour had its strengths and weaknesses, for sure. Music will always evolve and change. There will be bigger bands that will be the bigger draw. There was a lot of new rock coming in. By the time Nirvana hit the scene, that was really starting to affect things. The Seattle Grunge thing really affected the hair-metal kind of look.

I always thought that Kiss was one step above hair metal just because of the powerful nature of Gene and Paul as performers and entertainers and songwriters and the history of the makeup era. But we were still lumped into that, basically. There were some cracks in the armor there, I guess.

Then you made Revenge, which was a success.

Bringing [Bob] Ezrin in was very helpful in focusing the band on getting the best songs. I think Ezrin is a mad-professor genius and I love working with him. I love Revenge. That’s actually my favorite CD that I was involved with, even though there’s highlights with all my albums. We tested them out with “God Gave Rock ‘n’ Roll” and we got an offer to do that Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey soundtrack song.

“God Gave” was an [Argent] cover that they changed the lyrics for. What a brilliant song, what a fantastic vehicle for my guitar playing. I could play clean things, Hendrix-y Strat things, Brian May harmony lead things. What a terrific song.

The whole record was just more of that. I was able to really … I went for the throat, and I wasn’t afraid of the whammy bar. It was the whammy bar with attitude. It was not Crazy Nights. Everything was powerful. I just love that record. I think every song is a home run, and Ezrin did an incredible job.

Then we did Alive III, with was a great, supercharged version of the Kiss catalog that the band did. And now with Eric Singer on drums where he wasn’t on a leash. There’s a lot of double bass drums and powerful things going on in the songs. To me, it was just a turbocharged version of Alive and Alive II.

Watching Eric Carr as he suffered from cancer must have been very painful for you and everyone.


Yeah. For me, because I wasn’t in New York and I was already in L.A., we kept in touch quite often. And his girlfriend, Carrie Stevens, I was close with as well. Wow. He was incredibly brave. I’m still very, very much moved by the strength he had to handle such a horrific illness. I know we’re coming up on the 30th anniversary of his passing in November 2021. It’s unbelievable it’s been so long.

But he’s loved by so many. That’s the beauty of all this body of work he left behind with Kiss and all the YouTubes and albums and live concerts and the videos. He has such a loving following. I certainly am very fortunate that I knew the man that well.

How was the convention tour you did with Kiss? You were playing unplugged, and that was obviously a very different kind of show than what you’d done before.

That was the real indication by Gene and Paul of, “I think everyone is looking for the makeup stuff. These Kiss convention are so big that maybe we need to do our own version of that.” And so Gene and Paul come up with these Kiss conventions. Gene wants to charge $100 a ticket. Paul and I looked at each other like, “That’s a lot of money.”

Think about that now. It’s not a lot of money. They’re going to sign things. We’re going to perform. There’s going to be a museum. For back then, it just seemed like a high ticket.

But the people at MTV heard about this and discovered us. They thought this was great, and they were the ones that pushed the angle of, “What about a reunion?” Ace and Pete were still doing clubs and things like that, so they’d certainly entertain that.

That was the catalyst, the MTV Unplugged and making nice and signing contracts and then doing the reunion tour. And that was the end of my era.

In your entire time in Kiss, did you think the day would come one day where the makeup would come back on and Ace would return?

I always would hear things about Ace wanting to get back in the band. I wasn’t really very clear about how or when it could happen. But then again, I thought I had maybe three or five years of being in Kiss, and then the whole thing would either implode or it would go back to what they were. I always make the analogy to the way that Star Wars was so big. And then there’s 20 years of nothing new from Star Wars. Then all of a sudden, I don’t need to tell you what they were able to do. They introduced it to a whole other generation.

The timing was right for Kiss to go back in makeup. I didn’t do anything wrong; Eric Singer didn’t didn’t anything wrong. We were making great music and working well together, but this nostalgia thing, which is the same reason why Star Wars just took off again, and Star Trek had to be turned into 10 spinoff shows, is when something is unique like that, people always want it. They want to share it with new generations. There they go. They went back into the makeup.

To go back a bit, Carnival of Souls is a cool record. Can you tell me a bit about that?

Sure. Basically, we finished the convention tour and MTV. We worked on the mixing to release [the MTV Unplugged album]. But Gene was constantly writing. Paul was not sure what to do after Revenge and all that. I started to embrace [the fact that] music was getting harder and heavier. I could write that. I started really focusing on riffs and ideas. Gene, Eric, and I would constantly go in the studio. I have all those tapes. A few of them wound up on The Vault from Gene.

It was time to record since we had another record due with Polygram. We got Toby Wright, a good engineer-producer that worked with some of those other bands. He knew Kiss. He worked with us back in the Crazy Nights era.

He certainly knew that Alice in Chains sound. Gene embraced it more than Paul, this kind of meaner, darker, heavier thing, since he’s writing songs like “Hate” and “In My Head” and “Nest of Termites.” He loved Trent Reznor and Nine Inch Nails and got what everyone was doing.

We recorded it, but in the middle they were negotiating the reunion tour. I think a lot of the focus, at times, was a bit distracted. But I stayed focus and I had nine co-writes and they let me sing “I Walk Alone” since Toby said, “Bruce should sing this.” I didn’t realize how prophetic this was, since I certainly was walking alone very shortly after that record. And the record didn’t even come out right away.

My favorite is “Childhood’s End.” Can you talk about writing that with Gene?

Like I said, Eric and Gene and I were in this demo studio quite a bit. Tommy [Thayer] knew Gene really well and did a lot of work with the band on different levels. He had an idea for a song. What’s interesting about “Childhood’s End” is that I heard two songs by Gene that I thought should be put together. It was missing a couple of links. I told Gene. Tommy wasn’t there. I said, “This song, and this part, and this part, belongs together. And here’s a cool bridge section that could tie them together.”

It was less my idea, and more my idea to put a few things together and a couple of chords and a section like that. It wound up being a cool track. Gene wanted a choir, and got some kids from a local school to sing. It was like Ezrin would have done, like he did on the Destroyer record.

Why do you play so much bass on the record?

That’s just on Paul’s songs. That was Paul. Once he got focused on the songwriting, I was working with another songwriter that Paul knew, this guy Curtis Cuomo. I wound up working with him in that band Union with [John] Corabi. I played the bass on the demos, so Paul would always be like, “You play the bass, Bruce.”

That even happened on Revenge. I played some bass. Ezrin was like, “I like this demo. Let’s have Bruce play the bass.” The band, like the Beatles, didn’t care. Everyone knows that McCartney played the “Taxman” solo. Why wouldn’t you think that was George Harrison unless you were told otherwise? They didn’t have any egos like, “I play all the bass.” And so Paul played bass on “Love Gun” I heard. And Eric Carr played bass on “I Still Love You.” He wasn’t a great bass player, but it’s a simple song. He had the right feel. Whatever worked in the studio, we didn’t get weird about that.

How did they tell you the original band was re-forming and you were out?

Eric and I were told we were having a meeting up at Gene’s guesthouse. They explained that after they MTV thing, they were negotiating. Agents were offering stupid money. “We’re going to try this for a year. We’re going to keep paying you, so stay on the sidelines. We don’t know what’s going to happen. If it blows up or doesn’t do well, we’re back to what we had.”

Why should they throw the whole basket out? We were functioning. But with the success of the reunion tour, I didn’t have to quit. There was just no reason to go back to what we had.

Did you see any shows on that tour?

Yeah. I saw them in L.A. All the fans were like, “See you next year, Bruce.” I was like, “Uhh …”

Was it weird being there?

It was weird. Of course, I’m always supportive. I get success. I support success. I respect Gene and Paul’s tremendous ability to be talented enough and smart enough to package something like Kiss and create this excitement. Inside, I might have been devastated, but nobody saw that.

How could I feel good? How could anyone feel good? But I was supportive. I used to say very simply, “That tour made $40 million. The one before that made $4 million. How do you argue with that?”

I went to the Hall of Fame induction when Kiss got in. There was this great moment where all these fans in the stands were yelling, “Brooooce.” I looked around for Springsteen since he was there that night, but I realized they were yelling for you.

I was very pleased about that, and just to have Tom Morello mention my name. HBO caught a few great shots of me at the table with Tommy and Eric Singer, who were also screwed. They deserved it too. It was really tragic. Paul and Gene had a really hard line with the Hall of Fame.

And like I said, I’ve embraced the fans so much. I’m very aware of my status and my Kisstory and how much I’m part of that family. I’m very proud of it.

The Hall of Fame seems to have no clear standards. With some groups, they’ll take anybody. They’ll take a bass player that joined five days before the ceremony. You were there for 12 years.

There’s other bands they’ve screwed as well. It’s still wrong. I know Heart had tremendous success later on, but they only inducted the early Heart. That’s wrong. Those guys had multi-platinum records with other really talented musicians. It’s a travesty, but the fans know. I’d love to be inducted, but I don’t need that to have the acceptance of my fans. I know what I contributed to that band.

You still went that night. That’s another example of you taking the high road and being positive.

I was very happy when Paul and Gene invited me. They treated me like I was in the band. They flew me out first class. They put me up at the same hotel. I was driving with the guys in what looked like armored Suburban limousines. We all walked in late, purposely I think, since they were trying to make a statement. I was team Kiss.

Even if they were showboating a bit about not wanting to play the game, and they were fighting with Ace and Peter, they certainly would have liked to have played. It should have been an unplugged performance with all of us. But the Hall of Fame didn’t get it, wouldn’t allow it, so screw them.

How was your experience on the Kiss Kruise a few years ago when you played with them, and even with Ace? That was pretty great for the fans.

All the cruises are incredible. The fact I have that captured a rabid Kiss fan audience to do a very specific set largely representing my era is magical for me and them. I’m booked on the next Kiss Kruise, and yesterday I spent quite a bit of time going over the songs for my guys. We’re exchanging emails and we’re trying to figure out what to do to make it special again for 2021.

This is a weird year, of course, but I’m going to approach the cruise like I always do and entertain them. As I like to say, my buffet is very broad-based. I’m able to give them some of the dishes they don’t always get from the makeup Kiss.

You played with Gene, Paul, and Ace on their recent solo records.

I’ve been very willing and happy to be involved on all levels, and it’s always worked out. The fans love it. I know that. They were very excited to hear when I did a Hendrix song for the last tribute record that Ace put out. There’s even a pre-Kruise event I’m booked at where Ace will sit in for a few songs. That will happen a couple days before the Kiss Kruise. All those events are exciting and I love connecting with the fans, and performing for them.

At the final Kiss concert, is there a chance you’ll come out and play with them?

That’s always been kind of what they’ve shared publicly. I’ll be honest, It’s not like I have the plan or, like, Gene and Paul said to me, “This is how we want to do it. These are the songs.”

I don’t have the details. [My wife] Lisa and I chat about it because people ask. I do know I’ll be at least able to capture [Kiss manager] Doc [McGhee] on the boat for a little bit and go, “What’s the plan?” I don’t want to dance around the questions. I have some ideas of how this could be. “Tell me what you’re thinking?”

There was a big pause button on their schedule. They would have ended their tour this summer if Covid never happened. They had a venue booked. It was a stadium in New York. That was going to be the end. Now I don’t know when it would be, if it’s in 2022. I don’t know. I hope I’m there. I hope I get to play a couple songs with them.

The fans are expecting something special, and it should be. Everyone alive should be there. I’m not going to tell them that Vinnie [Vincent] should be there if they don’t want to see Vinnie. I do hope Ace and Peter are going to be a part of it as well.

Do you believe them that this is their last tour? This is their second farewell tour.

I do think they will stop touring in a traditional sense. Would they manage and present other Kiss-related things? You know, they have this idea that Kiss will never die. They could have a Kiss-themed show they aren’t in. … Could they pull that off successfully? Absolutely. Kiss is a brand like Coca-Cola.

I do think Gene and Paul will retire from touring. I know Gene well enough. They won’t carry on with what you know as a big touring Kiss show forever. They just can’t. They don’t want to do it. To be honest, me playing that big festival in Minnesota, I’m running around like it’s 20 or 30 years ago, I’m like, “I don’t want to do this forever. I don’t have that energy to do it forever.”

I want to do it as long as I can, but how about Gene in a 40-pound outfit performing a two-hour show? No way. Paul’s had hip surgeries. You can’t sustain that. It’s harder and harder the older you get.

They’re going to do some great business and some great shows. But they’re going to wrap it up in a year or so. I think they will.

My final thought: When I watch the Kiss concerts from your era, I see a band trying to prove something. You’re trying to prove you don’t need the makeup and you can play these new songs. There’s an excitement to that.

That’s why the non-makeup era is so important to so many fans. It’s not that they didn’t like the makeup era, but they don’t get why there’s not enough love or respect or attention for it. Kiss doesn’t do merchandise from it. Kiss doesn’t focus on it. I get that they’re pushing their brand, which is the makeup thing and celebrating that. Hopefully when they wrap it up at the end, it’ll be about 50 years and not just the makeup years.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Marty Scurll »

Thanks for copy and pasting that. Much appreciated. Good read.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by In the Suds »

This Unknown Legends series by Andy Greene is really fantastic.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by StillAlive »

Marty Scurll wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:26 am Thanks for copy and pasting that. Much appreciated. Good read.
No problem.
That's only the KISS portion.
There's a whole lot more on Meatloaf, Grand Funk, Union, etc.
Crazy long article.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Doose »

Nice interview!! Bruce must be over the moon about it. Glad to see him getting some accolades.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by jannep17 »

Great interview. The bit about his audition is hilarious.
He should write a book about his Kiss years...
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Kiss-Army-Sergeant »

StillAlive wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:16 am
How much are you trying to replicate the Ace and Vinnie Vincent guitar parts, and how much are you trying to put your own spin on them?

That’s a great question. Paul gave me a live tape that showed Vinnie Vincent, and I didn’t think he had the right approach to a lot of the songs. Unlike modern Kiss … and Tommy Thayer is a dear friend. He was totally ready to step in for Ace when Ace was being very difficult and eventually disappeared, and there is Tommy with the gig. They wanted Tommy to be the Spaceman and play Ace’s riffs.

I was never given that edict by Gene and Paul. But they also knew I had a good enough musical approach to their songs. I love to learn the signature riffs of anyone’s solo, and then make it my own. I don’t have to be a clone, but I can certainly show you the respect and give you those riffs that you’re used to hearing, but maybe play it a little bit with my swagger and my interpretation so it’s not lost to the world at all. It’s still the song.
So that answers the question of whether Tommy was told to play Ace's riffs or he chose to copy them. Glad to read that Bruce, a more accomplished guitar player, had a little more creative freedom.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Goodwilltowardsall »

vinniestkulick wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:22 am
Goodwilltowardsall wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:09 am I really enjoyed a solo album of his, sorry can't remember the name.
I think this is the order of his solo albums:
AUDIO DOG
TRANSFORMER
BK3
Thanks, very talented guy.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by richardsimmons »

Great read.

Very cool to hear class from Bruce (& Peter too).

Thanks StillAlive for posting it ITT.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Bruce »

Thanks for posting!
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by OHKISSFAN »

Great Interview - thanks for posting!

Also this: " They had a venue booked. It was a stadium in New York."
Never heard of what the specific venue was before - I knew people were speculating about Central Park too...
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Kiss-Army-Sergeant »

OHKISSFAN wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 3:05 pm Great Interview - thanks for posting!

Also this: " They had a venue booked. It was a stadium in New York."
Never heard of what the specific venue was before - I knew people were speculating about Central Park too...
I had heard it was CitiField.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by slipkid69 »

Bruce really seems like a stand up guy. I’m glad he has had a long and successful career. He is a great player who I always thought was very tasteful in his playing.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Ace of Bass »

Damn good interview. Thank you for posting.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Kissoff »

The interviewer did a great job!!!
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by UltraCynic »

Thanks for copying and pasting.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by In the Suds »

I didn't know know that Bruce played with Andrea True. That's pretty wild.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by StillAlive »

In the Suds wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 8:14 pm I didn't know know that Bruce played with Andrea True. That's pretty wild.
I'm old enough to remember the Andre True Connection (AM radio in the 70's).
Had no idea she was a porn star lol
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by EasyCatMan »

It was really good to see Bruce get some of the recognition he deserves. He really should write a book.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by redinthesky »

Wow, easily the best Bruce interview I've ever read or heard. And in Rolling Stone no less, good for Bruce. He actually even got a touch bold here and there. Makes me a bit more confident a book by Bruce won't be as sugary as one may expect.

One interesting Bruce line...."I’m not a big drug user." Or as I read it, "I’m not a big drug user." Hmm...
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by KalB »

Fantastic article!

Never realized Kanye sampled two tracks off the second Blackjack album.
Good for Bruce, "The College Dropout" is 4X Platinum - those must be some nice royalty checks.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by BarkBlue »

Really enjoyed this. Thanks for putting it up.

I've always loved Bruce's era in the band and respect him hugely. This article has only cemented that view!
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by warmachine731 »

Terrific interview.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Bruce »

redinthesky wrote: Sat Sep 25, 2021 1:49 pm One interesting Bruce line...."I’m not a big drug user." Or as I read it, "I’m not a big drug user." Hmm...
Soft drugs, like weed & hash -- perhaps?
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Mr. Kiss »

Excellent piece. Nice to see RS give Bruce the recognition he deserves.

Interesting to read about Bruce's comments regarding Carr's frequent complaining (presumably) about his role in Kiss. Then again, he was quick to point out that his so-called gripes had "merit" as time went on. Go figure. :?
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Tito »

Finally got around to reading this. Excellent, pretty much the definitive Bruce interview so far. Good to see him get some recognition.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Tito »

Mr. Kiss wrote: Sat Sep 25, 2021 4:32 pm Interesting to read about Bruce's comments regarding Carr's frequent complaining (presumably) about his role in Kiss. Then again, he was quick to point out that his so-called gripes had "merit" as time went on. Go figure. :?
Go figure? Literally the next line was "You just had to know how to handle it", which seems the key point here. So in Bruce's estimation, Eric didn't.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by woodworm001 »

Great article - thanks for posting
Marty Scurll wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:09 am I have a good ad blocker and i still couldn't read it for all the pop ups.
I use uBlock in firefox and it's blocked 390 elements in a couple of minutes on that page
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Marty Scurll »

woodworm001 wrote: Sun Sep 26, 2021 2:34 am Great article - thanks for posting
Marty Scurll wrote: Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:09 am I have a good ad blocker and i still couldn't read it for all the pop ups.
I use uBlock in firefox and it's blocked 390 elements in a couple of minutes on that page
Crazy! I use Adblock on safari. It usually gets the job done but not on this page. A couple of ads are okay,but 390! Ridiculous.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by curryleaf »

What a great interview, one of the best I've read from any Kiss member, ever. Bruce seems like a genuinely stand-up guy. Would love to see him go a little deeper into the dirt with a book of his own.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Thunderous_Lay »

That was really really comprehensive; great stuff.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Tail of a hurricane »

Best Bruce interview ever. I was hoping it was in the mag itself, but its not.
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Re: Good interview with Bruce Kulick (Rolling Stone)

Post by Mackemkiss »

This made me laugh!

"Meat Loaf was like a man possessed in those days. He put so much energy into those shows that I’ve read he’d walk offstage and almost pass out.
He was over 300 pounds. He came from the acting world. He did The Rocky Horror Picture Show. His passion was entertainment. He really stood out. It wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea. I know when Paul Stanley saw the show, he walked out. I get it. It’s not for everybody."